Decisions -Study Training

HAVE YOU REALLY FOUND OUT that THIS JOB AND THE TRAINING SUITS YOU,  BEFORE YOU INVEST YOUR TIME AND MONEY ON IT?

Try going to three work places,  questioning, visiting, offer yourself for work experience, before spending your time and money.

Your character, personality, self discipline, ethics and values are just as important as your academic results.  Doing your best and achieving well academically proves you can apply yourself and achieve well at anything you put your mind, heart and soul to.

Academic Statistics – In Canterbury  in 2018 – pre-covid, 11% left without level 1,  9% left with level 1, 14% left with level 2, 42 % left with Level 3,

In 2018 there were 61,297 domestic school leavers. Of these, 59.7% (36,582 students) enrolled in tertiary education at all levels during 2019.  Polytechnics like Ara, Southern Institute of Technology, Vision College, North Canterbury Community College, NZ Institute of Sport, NZ School of Tourism, College of Early Childhood Education,  Yoobee, Universities – Lincoln, Canterbury, Otago, Lincoln, Laidlaw College etc, training in trades and professions

What did the other 40 % do ?

Most others do on the job training like Air NZ,  Apprentices, Defence Force, Farming, Fishing, Forestry, Fire Service, Manufacturing, Police and Service IQ training like – The Warehouse, McDonalds,  Farmers, Bakery Hospitality, Cookery,  etc…

READ MORE about Growing industries, skills required etc  Careers Advisors presentation

SCHOOL
STAR – Secondary Tertiary Alignment Resources – helping students to do Industry unit standards both in school and out of school while at school

Dual Enrolement – doing 1-2 days a week all year at polytechnic level.  https://www.ara.ac.nz/study/youth-pathways/dual-enrolment-programmes/

Gateway – workplacements funded by TEC which earn 20 industry credits or more per person.

TEC – Gateway is designed to support school students’ transition into the workforce by offering them               workplace learning while at secondary school. This should include a formal agreement (like an individualised learning plan) between the school, the student and the workplace.  https://www.tec.govt.nz/funding/funding-and-performance/funding/fund-finder/gateway/

The workplace learning should include:

  • set unit standards for the student to work towards and achieve
  • specific assessment methods.

TERTIARY  institutions for training  levels 4-10
One year FEES free training under the Labour Government from 2019 is available at most tertiary provided courses at polytechnics and universities.

Scholarships – Scholarships are offered by universities, companies and private organisations to students from all over New Zealand.  Read more…Resources

Youth Guarantee offers FEE FREE courses for those without level 3 through some course providers over and above the free year labour offered. Read more…
https://www.tec.govt.nz/funding/funding-and-performance/funding/fund-finder/youth-guarantee/


Apprenticeships –
can be started directly by finding a willing employer who will take you on with your current academic results and abilities and wants to train you their way. The Unit standards are assessed on the job and set by the appropriate Industry Training Organisation

*BCITO Carpentry
*Service IQ  Retail
*Hospitality & Tourism
*Competenz – Baking & Engineering
*Connexius – Electronic telecommunications,
*Extraction ITO, which are currently handing over direct apprenticeships to the new NZ tertiary institute.  https://skills.org.nz/blog/rove-governance-roles-in-progress/ 

Polytechnics like Ara, Southern Institute of Technology, Vision College-ATC, Music & Audio Institute of NZ, North Canterbury Community College, National Trade Academy, NZ Institute of Sport, NZ School of Tourism, College of Early Childhood Education, Yoobee, Universities – Lincoln, Canterbury, Otago, Lincoln, Laidlaw College etc, training in trades and professions

Polytechnics

Ara https://www.ara.ac.nz/
Southern Institute of Technology, SIT2LRN https://www.sit.ac.nz/
Vision College-ATC https://visioncollege.ac.nz/
Mainz https://www.sit.ac.nz/Campus/MAINZ-Christchurch?subject=Creative-Industries
NCCC,   Com Col https://www.comcol.ac.nz/community-college-north-canterbury-03-313-5874.html
National Trade Academy https://www.nta.co.nz/
NZIS
https://www.nzis.co.nz/our-campuses/christchurch-campus/
NZ School of Tourism
https://nzschooloftourism.co.nz/
College Early Childhood
https://www.nztertiarycollege.ac.nz/
Yoobee
https://www.yoobee.ac.nz/

Universities

Auckland Uni. of Technology https://www.aut.ac.nz/
Graduate school  ChCh  Bachelor courses  https://www.nzgse.ac.nz/
Laidlaw College ChCh   Bachelor courses  https://www.laidlaw.ac.nz/
Auckland https://www.auckland.ac.nz/
Canterbury https://www.canterbury.ac.nz/
Lincoln https://www.lincoln.ac.nz/
Massey          https://www.massey.ac.nz/
Otago             https://www.otago.ac.nz/
Victoria         https://www.wgtn.ac.nz/
Waikato         https://www.waikato.ac.nz/

WORK FORCE DEVELOPMENT COUNCILS
Six new Workforce Development Councils formally established today, 15 May 2021, will ensure people graduate with the right skills at the right time to address skill shortages, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said.

Every industry in New Zealand will be covered by one of the following Workforce Development Councils:

  • Hanga-Aro-Rau – Manufacturing, Engineering and Logistics
  • Waihanga Ara Rau – Construction and Infrastructure
  • Muka Tangata – People, Food and Fibre
  • Toi Mai – Creative, Cultural, Recreation and Technology
  • Community, Health, Education and Social Services, and
  • Services Industries.

“The newly formed Workforce Development Councils will play a fundamental role in creating a unified vocational education system that will bring together industry and educators to make sure New Zealand’s workforce is fit for today’s needs and tomorrow’s expectations,” Chris Hipkins said.

“They will have a forward, strategic view of the future skills needs of industries and will help industry achieve greater influence over what and how training is delivered, by influencing government investment, setting skill standards and playing a leadership role across their relevant industries.”

The Councils are a keystone change of the Reform of Vocational Education (RoVE) programme, and will help to build a workforce with the skills needed to aid in our recovery from COVID-19.